5 reasons to read Margo Glantz, Carlos Fuentes Award for Literary Creation


The work of Margo Glantz (Mexico City, 1930) “she opened the way for later generations of Ibero-American writers, as well as for her indelible contribution to letters and her poetic intelligence”, the organizers pointed out in a statement”, argued the jury made up of María Fernanda Ampuero, Liliana Weinberg, David Huerta, Pedro Ángel Palou and Diamela Eltithis decision to grant the Mexican author the Carlos Fuentes International Award for Literary Creation in the Spanish Language.

If you are looking to verify the jury’s decision on your own, we offer you a literary guide to learn about their work.

The genealogies. Pocket-size.

Family autobiography, The Genealogies traces the Central European origins of the Glantz family, follows in the footsteps of the forced pilgrimage, witnesses their roots and flourishing on Mexican soil, all from the fervent and astonished perspective of the author, who bears witness to the epic of his own and joins her as the protagonist. An emotional testimony that recovers the origins of a Jewish family in Mexico.

The trail is a text that talks about a burial, and the protagonist’s feelings when contemplating the body of a man with whom she lived for a long time, whom she has stopped seeing and whom she sees again already exsanguinated, and the memory of that body when it was alive and shared a very intense love relationship with those who look at it. But by doing so, that is, by reviving it in writing, the decay of the body is cancelled. Writing allows you to bring things back to life. It should be remembered that with this novel, Margo Glantz won the Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Award from the Guadalajara FIL and was a finalist for the Herralde Award.

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And by looking at everything, I saw nothing. Sixth floor.

Glantz resorts to one of the greatest imprints of his narrative work: fragmentary writing. She heir to a tradition that goes from Walter Benjamin to David Markson, she puts on the same page the horrors of ISIS and the addictions of Charlie Sheen and the consequences of the ecocide that is carried out on a planetary scale; Kafka’s aphorisms and horrifying reports of femicides in Mexico and other countries of the world. The writer gives us a collage of emotions, images, data and reflections that in her thunderous echo forces us to stop along the way to ponder the best way to continue in the increasingly arduous task of walking through this world.

For a brief injury. Sixth floor.

“Today, which one am I talking about today?” asks the narrator of the book, who also wonders throughout this fascinating novel who is the self that speaks. Through these pages —written over sixteen years— the same old loves parade, as intimate or banal experiences, works of art, musical pieces or thousands of readings along with everything that has left a scar on the writer to configure an extensive Anthropological portrait that questions and tears reality from experience to memory.

The text finds a body. Ampersand.

A writer’s library opens before our eyes to fascinate us. “My gaze breaks into the fragment”, declares Margo Glantz, “it is a feminine gaze” that focuses above all on detail. With that sensitivity, he reviews the sentimental and libertine literature of the 18th century. She surveys English, French, and North American literature to compile an erudite cartography of literary heroines and authors, akin to the knowledge of whom she has previously read passionately. So much so that when reading touches a body, the text can become a jewel or even a flower, perfect.

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Reference-aristeguinoticias.com

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5 reasons to read Margo Glantz, Carlos Fuentes Award for Literary Creation


The work of Margo Glantz (Mexico City, 1930) “she opened the way for later generations of Ibero-American writers, as well as for her indelible contribution to letters and her poetic intelligence”, the organizers pointed out in a statement”, argued the jury made up of María Fernanda Ampuero, Liliana Weinberg, David Huerta, Pedro Ángel Palou and Diamela Eltithis decision to grant the Mexican author the Carlos Fuentes International Award for Literary Creation in the Spanish Language.

If you are looking to verify the jury’s decision on your own, we offer you a literary guide to learn about their work.

The genealogies. Pocket-size.

Family autobiography, The Genealogies traces the Central European origins of the Glantz family, follows in the footsteps of the forced pilgrimage, witnesses their roots and flourishing on Mexican soil, all from the fervent and astonished perspective of the author, who bears witness to the epic of his own and joins her as the protagonist. An emotional testimony that recovers the origins of a Jewish family in Mexico.

The trail is a text that talks about a burial, and the protagonist’s feelings when contemplating the body of a man with whom she lived for a long time, whom she has stopped seeing and whom she sees again already exsanguinated, and the memory of that body when it was alive and shared a very intense love relationship with those who look at it. But by doing so, that is, by reviving it in writing, the decay of the body is cancelled. Writing allows you to bring things back to life. It should be remembered that with this novel, Margo Glantz won the Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Award from the Guadalajara FIL and was a finalist for the Herralde Award.

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And by looking at everything, I saw nothing. Sixth floor.

Glantz resorts to one of the greatest imprints of his narrative work: fragmentary writing. She heir to a tradition that goes from Walter Benjamin to David Markson, she puts on the same page the horrors of ISIS and the addictions of Charlie Sheen and the consequences of the ecocide that is carried out on a planetary scale; Kafka’s aphorisms and horrifying reports of femicides in Mexico and other countries of the world. The writer gives us a collage of emotions, images, data and reflections that in her thunderous echo forces us to stop along the way to ponder the best way to continue in the increasingly arduous task of walking through this world.

For a brief injury. Sixth floor.

“Today, which one am I talking about today?” asks the narrator of the book, who also wonders throughout this fascinating novel who is the self that speaks. Through these pages —written over sixteen years— the same old loves parade, as intimate or banal experiences, works of art, musical pieces or thousands of readings along with everything that has left a scar on the writer to configure an extensive Anthropological portrait that questions and tears reality from experience to memory.

The text finds a body. Ampersand.

A writer’s library opens before our eyes to fascinate us. “My gaze breaks into the fragment”, declares Margo Glantz, “it is a feminine gaze” that focuses above all on detail. With that sensitivity, he reviews the sentimental and libertine literature of the 18th century. She surveys English, French, and North American literature to compile an erudite cartography of literary heroines and authors, akin to the knowledge of whom she has previously read passionately. So much so that when reading touches a body, the text can become a jewel or even a flower, perfect.

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Reference-aristeguinoticias.com

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Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.