Netflix Crime Scene – Cecil Hotel Disappearance Reveals Danger From Online Detectives. This is how a musician was wrongly accused of murder.

Crime Scene: The Disappearance at Hotel Cecil reveal the danger of online detectives. Now streaming on Netflix, Joe Berlinger’s four-part docuseries examines the 2013 death of Elisa Lam, a 21-year-old Canadian who died mysteriously in the titular hotel in downtown Los Angeles. Crime scene it also tells the story of a Mexican musician who was wrongly accused of murdering Lam by amateur detectives.

In Crime scene, several interviewees offer their opinions on the infamous Hotel Cecil and address popular conspiracy theories associated with the Lam case. The subject initially disappeared on January 31, 2013, after hotel guests had complained about his behavior. A few days later, Lam’s naked body was found inside a water tank on top of the Hotel Cecil. In mid-February 2013, the LAPD released security footage showing Lam acting erratically inside a hotel elevator, sparking numerous conspiracy theories about his fate. Some people believe that she was targeted by an unidentified killer, while others have theorized that she may have experienced a bad drug trip. Berlinger’s Netflix documentary series attempts to explain what went wrong and concludes that Lam accidentally drowned after suffering a manic episode, the result of not taking his prescription medication.

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Crime scene takes an especially dark turn in the third episode, “Down in the Rabbit Hole.” As online detectives investigate what may have happened to Lam, they come across an online musician known as “Morbid” who once stayed at the Cecil Hotel and posted dark videos online. Despite the lack of concrete evidence, Lam’s supporters lashed out at his target, demonstrating the reactionary nature of the digital age blame game. Because Morbid seemed guilty and because people wanted him to be guilty, the perception turned into facts, an unhealthy way of dealing with conflict. In the fourth episode of the Netflix documentary “The Hard Truth,” Pablo C. Vergara, also known as Morbid, debunks the theories of Lam’s murders and reveals that he attempted suicide due to constant online harassment.

Pablo Vergara AKA Morbid in Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel on Netflix

According to Vergara, his music career was almost destroyed due to his association with the Lam case. Crucially, he explains that his trip to the Cecil Hotel happened a year before Lam’s death, but online detectives didn’t bother to acknowledge that aspect of the case, nor did anyone apologize after the fact when it became apparent that Lam had drowned. accidentally. While some Netflix viewers may not approve of Vergara’s death metal content, the fact remains that creative freedom of expression is really important in a democratic society. If Morbid had more fame, then maybe online trolls would have spent more time sorting out the facts before sending hate messages.

In a strange but convenient twist, Netflix portrays Vergara as a random online musician from Mexico, when in reality he is an accomplished filmmaker who received a scholarship from the New York Film Academy. The streaming service has produced a variety of high-profile serial killer documentaries in recent years, but it might be worth spending less time sensationalizing stories in favor of full backstories for interviewees and subjects. Docuseries always result in passionate responses from viewers, and Vergara’s experiences serve as a reminder that context is indeed key when interpreting true crime narratives.

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